LIGHT EMITTING DIODE LAMPS AND FIXTURES

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Light Emitting Diodes

0% Mercury Content
0% Toxic Material
85% Energy Saving

We recommend that prior to purchasing product,
you review the information in these sections:

SELECTING YOUR LAMP

COMPARISON: LED TO OTHER SOURCES

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selecting Your Lamp

Not all LED Lamps are the same. When determining which lamp will best meet your need, there are a number of factors to consider. The following is a general guideline of things to keep in mind when making your selection.
If you have any questions or need assistance with your lighting design, please contact Regal LED Lighting Solutions.

Colour Temperature
Warm White (2700 - 3200K) is somewhat similar to the colour of an incandescent lamp and is normally selected for areas such as Living Rooms and Bedrooms and when illuminating earthtones.
Natural White (3500 - 4500K) is usually better for task lighting such as Kitchens amd Bathrooms and for illuminating cooler coloured items such as white/grey brick, etc.
True White (5000K+) is very blue white and is best for illuminating cold colour items like stainless steel or items like glass, diamonds, etc.

Beam Angle
Narrower beams provide higher intensity of light, over a smaller area. Wider beams provide a lower intensity of light over a wider area.
For area lighting, the height of the ceiling and the distance between lamps should be considered and if uniform illumination on the floor is desired, the beam should be such that it overlaps the beam from adjacent lamps.
For applications such as in cabinetry, where the distance from the lamp to the surface is short, a wide beam will be best to provide uniformity.
The lumen output of a lamp decreases as the colour temperature is lowered. i.e. True White projects more light than Warm White.

Lumen Output (MR16 Lamps)
MR16 Lamps are available in Series 4 and 5.
The lumen output of the lamps increase with the Series number
Not all beam angles are available in each series. Select your lamp by determining the beam angle that will best meet your need and then determine wiich series to select.
Prices increase with lumen output.
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Comparison of LED Lamps to Old Light Sources.

MR16 LED vs MR16 HALOGEN
  LED MR16 HALOGEN MR16*
Life (hours)
20,000~40,000
1000 ~ 3000
Wattage
7
50
Lumens
350 ~ 590
450
CRI
80 ~ 93
97 ~ 100
Colour Temperature
2700K ~ 6500K
2800K
UV Projected
NO
MINIMAL
IR Projected
NO
YES
Hazardous Materials (Mercury, Lead, etc)
NO
NO
Breakable
NO
YES
Recyclable
YES
NO
Distribution of light
5° ~ 120°
10° ~ 30°
ON/OFF
INSTANT
FAST
 
* Data from Osram Sylvania Catalogue

LED A LAMP vs COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMP
  LED A19 CFL†
Life (hours)
20,000
10,000
Wattage
7
13
Lumens
350
900
Lumen Maintenance
70% at 20,000 hrs
85% at 2,000 hrs
75% at 5,000 hrs
CRI
85
82
Colour Temperature
2700K
2700k
UV Projected
NO
YES
IR Projected
NO
YES
Hazardous Materials (Mercury, Lead, etc.)
NO
YES
Breakable
NO
YES
Recyclable
YES
NO
Distribution of Light
180°
360°
ON/OFF
INSTANT
SLOW
† Data from Philips Catalog
Because Incandescent "light bulbs" are being banned by Governments and
discontinued by many manufacturers, we have not made a comparison.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How long do LEDs last?
Unlike other light sources, Light Emitting Diodes normally don't suddenly burn out. Rather, they gradually fade over time. The useful life of a LED is normally based on the number of hours until the diode is emitting 70% of its initial light output. Usually referred to as L70.
The life of other light sources is based on the number of hours until 50% of the lamps have burned out. Some will last longer, but some will burn out much sooner.
A good LED will normally last 20,000 ~ 50,000 hours before reaching this point. This variable is due to how the LED is being used and the environmental conditions under which is is operated.
Projections of L70 on this site are based on minimum expectations.

How efficient is a LED?
The efficiency of LEDs vary by manufacturer, colour of the LED, etc. Some experimental LEDs have reached well over 100 lumens per watt. (lm/w) When part of a LED lamp, after losses from the electronic circuitry, lenses, etc., they typically provide in the range of 40 ~ 80 lm/w A typical incandescent lamp provides about 10 lumens per watt and a Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) is about 70 lm/w.

Are LEDs safe?
Unlike some other light sources, LEDs project neither Ultra-violet (UV) nor Infra-red (IR) radiation. They do not contain hazardous substances like Mercury or Lead. They are recyclable. They typically do not have parts made of glass or other fragile materials.

Why do LEDs have such a blue light?
Not all LEDs have that blue/white colour, in fact with LEDs you can have a choice of Corelated Colour Temperature (CCT) or colour of the light. LEDs are available in CCT from 2700K (similar to incandescent) to over 6000K (more blue than daylight). The CCT to choose when ordering will depend on the application. For example, for ambient lighting in a living room, a CCT in the range of 3000K (Warm White - WW) is fine, but for task lighting, such as in a kitchen, a higher CCT such as 4000K (Natural White - NW) will provide better visibility as it is closer to daylight. The higher CCT of 5000 ~ 6000K (True White - TW) is normally recommended for highlighting of cold colour items, such as white stone, stainless steel, etc.. For availability of TW product to meet your application please contact RLD.

Do colours of materials and paintings show correctly with LEDs?
The Colour Rendering Index of daylight is 100. Incandescent is normally from 97 to 100. Fluorescent will range from 70 to 85 and LEDs are available from 80 to 95.
For most applications, a CRI over 80 is acceptable. For applications where CRI is critical, contact Regal for availability of product to meet your specific needs.

Are LED lamps more expensive than incandescent or CFL?
LED lamps are only more expensive initially. Over the life of the product, they can actually be much less expensive.
If a CFL that costs $8.00, lasts 6000 hours and is 23 Watts is compared to a LED that costs $40.00, lasts 40,000 hours, and is 7 Watts, the actuall costs over the life of the LED is actually less. If you assume that the cost of electricity is 13 cents per Kwh (typical), then over the life of the LED, you will actually save $96.53

How can a LED lamp with lower lumens provide more light than an other source with higher lumens?
LEDs are directional so that all of the light produced is projected in one direction. This light is further controlled with focusing lenses to provide a variation in beam angles. LED Lamps are much more efficient than typical incandescent and fluorescent lamps.
Fluorescent and incandescent lamps are not directional. They distribute light at 360°. This light is somewhat controlled with reflectors in an attempt to beam the light in one direction. Typically, reflectors are not very efficient. For example, a recessed "pot light" usually has an efficiency of 50 ~65%, meaning that 35 to 50% of the light is lost.

Do you have a question?
Contact us and we will be glad to answer it.              

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